Overview

About SIMA

What is SIMA

The SIMA project seeks to construct a unified community atmospheric modeling system, for use in an Earth System Model (ESM), that enables diverse configurations for applications spanning minutes to centuries and global scales to cloud scales, including atmospheric forecasts and projections of the atmospheric state and composition from the surface to the thermosphere.

SIMA Vision

There is now pressure for modeling systems with capabilities for broader, more comprehensive application. The community would benefit immensely by having a unified atmospheric modeling system serving as a tool for the study of cross-disciplinary problems and enabling coupling to other Earth system component models. SIMA seeks to construct a unified community atmospheric modeling system, for use in an Earth System Model (ESM), that enables diverse configurations for applications spanning minutes to centuries and global scales to cloud scales, including atmospheric forecasts and projections of the atmospheric state and composition from the surface to the thermosphere. See the SIMA Vision document for more details.

History of SIMA

NCAR advisory panels and Site Visit Teams over the last 3 years have recommended that NCAR unify and integrate the atmospheric modeling efforts that are distributed to the community.

In response to this, NCAR and the community have developed a vision for the next generation of community models for the atmosphere: SIMA, the System for Integrated Modeling of the Atmosphere. The primary goal of the 'SIMA' system is to be able to conduct frontier science simulations in climate, weather and geospace research using the same modeling system.

The initial SIMA vision development arose from the Singletrack project, and featured a large number of NCAR staff and selected community participants. This project ran from January - December 2018 and developed a 'Vision document and Roadmap' that became SIMA. We have started some initial explorations of different options in a 'SIMA version 0' (SIMAv0) using extensions to our existing modeling systems.

To learn more see the SIMA Overview Presentation and the SIMA Workshop Introduction documents.

SIMA Timeline

  • Jan. 2018

    SIMA planning process started

  • 2019 - 2020

    Development of SIMA V0

  • Jun. 2020

    SIMA community workshop

  • 2021

    Development of SIMA V1

  • Sep. 2021

    Target date for SIMA V1 release to community

  • Jan. - May. 2018

    Organized, developed science goals, applications: Singletrack project

  • Jun. - Aug. 2018

    Develop a ‘Roadmap’, Solicit Community Feedback

  • Oct. - Dec. 2018

    Singletrack Roadmap available. More feedback (CESM/UCAR Members), name change to ‘SIMA’

  • Jan. - Feb. 2019

    SIMA Terms of Reference, CESM CAB presentation

  • Jul. 2019

    SIMA version 0 reinvestment project
  • Aug. - Dec. 2019

    SIMA Version 0 Development

  • Mar. 2020

    SIMA Community Workshop

  • Sep. 2020

    SIMA Version 1 Developments

  • Sep. 2021

    Target applications in SIMA framework (end of CY21)

SIMA v1

2020-2021

SIMA is currently developing Applications that are scheduled to be released to the community in Fall of 2021. The image below shows the latest application table.

SIMA v0

2019-2020

SIMAv0 advanced and integrated various NCAR modeling systems. Efforts included the following.

  • SIMAv0 Chemistry: A new portable and robust infrastructure for building and maintaining chemistry schemes was developed, as well as a regionally-refined chemical model setup for running over the US at 14 km.
  • SIMAv0 Geospace: The current dynamical cores were extended to the thermosphere, and coupling to a geomagnetic grid was enabled.
  • SIMAv0 Polar: A refined-mesh configuration of CESM2 with 14-km resolution over the Arctic and Greenland was developed for community use.
  • SIMAv0 Climate: A 14-km refined CESM2 mesh for the U.S. was developed for the community and a Refined Mesh Toolkit made available for mesh generation.
  • MPAS in CESM: The non-hydrostatic MPAS dynamical core was integrated into CESM to enable global, cloud-scale simulation with access to the Earth system components of CESM. In addition, implementation began of the Common Community Physics Package (CCPP) into CAM/CESM to allow easy access to CCPP-compliant physics schemes, including those from WRF and MPAS.